Pavement Parking

It’s been a little while since I’ve posted on here but I was really keen to blog about pavement parking as it can be a big issue for many people and it’s a subject which we get lots of enquiries and complaints about. Pavement parking can cause real issues for a number of people, particularly pedestrians, pushchairs and wheelchair users as it often affects their ability to use and keep to the safety of the pavement.

If a vehicle is parked on a pavement and there are parking restrictions on the adjacent highway, then it is something which Civil Enforcement Officers like me can enforce and we can issue Penalty Charge Notices but this would be because the motorist is contravening the restrictions on the highway rather than because of the pavement parking itself. For example, in the photograph below, a vehicle is parked on a pavement adjacent to double yellow lines and as there isn’t any activity taking place which would permit stopping on double yellow lines (e.g. unloading/loading of goods, passengers getting in or out of the vehicle etc.) a Penalty Charge Notice can be issued.

PavementParking 2

If a vehicle is parked on a pavement and there aren’t any parking restrictions on the adjacent highway or if there is a significant obstruction being caused, then this would fall under the responsibilities of the Police who would consider whether this was ‘wilful obstruction of the public highway’, which is an offence. In such instances you can dial the non-emergency Police line 101 who will deal with such matters at their own discretion.

Whilst this post is about pavement parking, you may also find these other posts which I’ve done about parking on dropped kerbs and blocked access of interest too:

Dropped Kerbs and Blocked Access
Who would you report this to?
Access Restricted

I hope the above is helpful and as always, if you’re a motorist, please park safely, legally and considerately.

2 thoughts on “Pavement Parking

  1. Re pavement parking. Doesn’t this depend on who owns the piece of land that the car is parked on? Surely if the land is privately owned then the highway restriction is irrelevant ….?

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    • Hi,

      Thanks for your question. Private land can be a factor but Traffic Regulation Orders (TROs) which are the legal document behind the parking or waiting restrictions on highways can still apply to adjacent private land, although this depends on the individual location. Usually, when it’s a public pavement, this will be maintained by the Highways Authority and the TRO will have been written to include the adjacent land.

      I hope this helps but if you’d like to know more about a particular location in North Essex, then please don’t hesitate to contact the NEPP office via parking@colchester.gov.uk or on 01206 282316 and they’ll be more than happy to help.

      Thanks,

      Anna

      Like

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